Arched Window Louvre Shutters

Arched window shutters

Arched window shutters

An upstairs verandah in a Sydney terrace had a bare brick opening in its side wall which the owner decided needed some louvre shutters. The owner had some discarded louvre doors available and we were approached to see if they could be recycled and used to make a set of louvre shutters for the wall opening.

The louvre doors were cut to size and fitted with arch sections which matched a timber frame that was built to fit inside the wall opening. Once the window frame had been painted it was fitted into the wall opening and fixed in position with black epoxy filler. Epoxy was used because the wall opening was not square and the arched top not a perfect circle arc resulting in clearance variations between the bricks and the wooden window frame.

As can be seen from the photo below the addition of the decorative window shutters was a major improvement to the overall look of the home.

Original opening in the upstairs verandah wall

Original opening in the upstairs verandah wall

Verandah view of window shutters

View of the window shutters from the verandah

 

Custom Japanese Style Pillar Lights

Custom Japanese style pillar lights for driveway entrance

Custom Japanese style pillar lights for driveway entrance

A recent project required the design of a pair of custom Japanese style Pillar lights for the entrance to a rural estate. Commercially available pillar lights were too small as the sandstone pillars were over two metres high and 800mm square. To simplify constructing a complete electrical fitting (which includes electrical safety standards compliance and rating) a commercial fitting was selected which was of a suitable style and construction that could be adapted to a larger fitting.

The new Japanese style pillar lights are essentially a lampshade that fits around the commercial fitting. The base section is fastened to the sandstone top of the pillar around the commercial fitting. The lightweight metal roof section is attached to the top of the metal frame of the commercial fitting which has had its glass shade removed.

Below details the steps in building the fitting.

Steel frame of the pillar light

Steel frame of the pillar light. This will be fixed to the pillar top

Translucent acrylic windows fitted to the metal base frame

Translucent acrylic windows fitted to the metal base frame


Marking out shape of the galvanised iron roof

Marking out shape of the galvanised iron roof

Folding the roof cutout section

Folding the roof cutout section with sheet metal bender

Completed top roof sections ready for painting

Completed top roof sections ready for painting

View of the base set around the commercial light fitting

View of the base set around the commercial light fitting

 

Stainless Garden Armillary Sphere

Stainless steel armillary sphere on front lawn

Stainless steel armillary sphere on front lawn

This DecoWorks stainless steel garden armillary sphere fitted to a sandstone column adds a unique and interesting feature to this front garden lawn.

The armillary sphere is 70cm high with the central sphere itself being 45cm in diameter. The finish is raw brushed stainless steel which will last many years exposed to the elements without any corrosion problems. The armillary sphere was shipped to an interstate client who arranged the cutting of the sandstone support column and the fitting of the sphere itself.

More information on armillary spheres can be found here. The sturdy base on the sphere can be easily attached to a support pillar such as this sandstone block or a custom structure.

Stainless steel garden armillary sphere

Stainless steel garden armillary sphere

Another view of the armillary sphere showing its solid construction

Another view of the armillary sphere showing its solid construction

Armillary Sphere Support

armillary sphere

Armillary sphere fitted onto new support

A client who had previously commissioned a DecoWorks polished stainless steel armillary sphere recently moved to a new, larger house. They wanted to remove the armillary sphere from the garden wall of the old house and have it re-installed in the garden of their new home. We were approached to design a new support for the armillary sphere so it could be placed in the garden of the new house.

In keeping with the materials used for the armillary sphere the support was constructed from stainless steel to ensure a long life in its seaside environment. Stained Merbau timber strips were cut and attached to the support framework to form the outer *skin* of the support.

Top of new support

Top of new support

Detail of timber clad armillary support

Detail of timber clad armillary support

After the new support had been concreted into position in the garden the armillary sphere simply bolted onto the top. It makes a great focal point in the garden and adds a unique visual addition to an already beautiful outlook.

Stainless steel armillary sphere on new support

Stainless steel armillary sphere on new support

Stainless Steel Security Grille

Artistic stainless steel window security grille

Artistic stainless steel window security grille installation

This unique artistic stainless steel security grille makes a very stylish addition to this family home in Sydney. The brief from the client was that she did not want traditional security bars on the front lounge room window because it would feel like living in a cage. In collaboration with the client the design evolved into a sinuous web of leafy vines.

Stainless steel was chosen for the construction to ensure a long and corrosion free life. Using flat bar gave the design a light and airy look while still maintaining a strong structure. More information on the stainless steel security grille construction can be found here.

Detail of the artistic security grille

Detail of the artistic security grille

Stainless Steel Armillary Sphere

Armillary sphere

Stainless steel armillary sphere on garden wall


Here is another installation of a DecoWorks Pty Ltd stainless steel armillary sphere. This armillary has been polished to a high lustre so it sparkles in the sunlight. Each sphere is built for a specific latitude so that the earth axis is parallel to the real world north/south axis.

Further information can be found on the page relating to the armillary’s construction details.

Stainless steel was chosen for the armillary’s construction because this particular sphere was going to Australia’s Gold Coast where the salt spray would destroy any other material over time. The armillary makes a fascinating focal point to the entrance gate and will look *as new* for many years to come.

The armillary sphere (from the Latin “armillae”, or bracelet) is a representation of the celestial sphere with the Earth at its centre. It was used by ancient astronomers to describe the motions of the stars and planets relative to the Earth. Their use and development had reached a zenith during the Renaissance. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the armillary sphere was more than ever a necessary accessory of the gentleman’s study or library.

Making a Custom Hinge

A commercially available custom hinge can usually be found to suit almost any application. However, sometimes a situation arises when a purpose built custom hinge needs to be made. Such a situation arose when a set of Art Deco security doors had to be installed on the inside of some outward opening courtyard doors. The security doors also needed to be able to open out as well or be left locked while the outer doors remained open.

To enable the inner and outer doors to be totally independent of each other they needed their own hinge but they also needed a common pivot so that they would not foul on each other when opened and closed. This was achieved by making a combination butt/parliament hinge where one flap was longer than the other but they both shared a common pivot flap.

The first step was to find hinges that allowed themselves to be modified into a custom hinge. Eventually a quantity of 90mm butt hinges were found that used 3mm thick steel flaps and had removable finial ended pivot pins. Additional parts to make the extended parliament flap were laser cut in 3mm steel. Once the extension pieces were assembled they could be welded to the required hinge flap. Photos of the installed hinges can be found on the completed installation link.

The pictures below show the steps involved in making the hinges.

Hinge parts

Parts used to make the custom hinge

Disassembled hinges

Two hinges were first disassembled

Making a longer pivot pin

Two pivot pins are joined together to make a longer pin to fit the wider hinge

Joining the two hinges

Two hinges are welded together on one side leaving two independent flaps held in place by the longer pivot pin.

Completed hinge extension pieces

Assembled laser cut hinge extension pieces

Fitting extension piece to one hinge

Fitting an extension piece to one hinge flap

Completed combination hinge

Completed combination hinge

The hinge in two positions showing operation

Hinge operation positions

Cabinet Sides and Assembly

Temporary assembly

Temporary assembly with staples to mark out dowel joints


Carrying on from the previous post on the cabinet construction the side panels were cut in a jig so they matched the bevel on the curved front panel. Once they were completed the top, bottom and intermediate shelves were cut with a radius that matched the inside radius of the front panel.

The completed parts of the cabinet were assembled in the original moulding form and held together with staples so the position of all the dowel joints could be determined. The cabinet was then disassembled and the holes for the dowels drilled. Since none of the joints were 90 degrees a special drilling jig was made so the holes could be drilled at 77 degrees.

Once all the dowel holes were drilled the parts were glued and pushed together. This proved a difficult task because of the tapered sides. Nothing could be pushed in squarely and, because of the angle of the sides, it was difficult to apply a force in the required direction for the joints to close. Eventually everything came together and the frame could be clamped and left to dry.

The above steps are illustrated below.

Making the sides

Side panel ready for routing using the front panel template.

Routed side panel

Side panel after routing the 45 degree edge to match the front panel.

Cutting the curved top, bottom and shelf panels

Cutting the curved top, bottom and shelf panels with a router

Drilling dowel holes

Drilling dowel holes with a 77 degree drill jig

Aligning drill jig

Looking down the drill guide to align it with the mark for the dowel position

Cabinet panels drilled and dowelled

Cabinet panels drilled and dowelled ready for assembly.

Assembling the cabinet frame

Assembling the cabinet frame

Cabinet frame clamped

Clamped and glued cabinet frame

Once the glue has dried the drawers need to be made along with the top splash board and back panel. The next cabinet post will deal with these items and the fitting of the handles, legs and marble top and splash board. The completed side cupboard can be seen on this page.