Custom Screen Door

 

View from inside house

Custom Screen Door Silhouette

Several years ago we refurbished the front gate and driveway gates for a client. We also made some matching double side gates for the side of the house. The client was very happy with these past projects so recently we were contacted again to replace an ugly screen door with a new custom screen door with the same style as the previous work we did.

It was a straight forward design made from 16mm square steel with the aluminium insect screen secured by a 13mm steel framework attached to the main frame using 5mm countersunk stainless steel screws.

As is usual with older homes the doorway was not square. It was tilted ~8mm from the vertical which, although it seems a tiny amount, becomes glaringly obvious when fitted with a rectangular frame that is square. Building a crooked frame to compensate for this requires a lot of patience and care. It can be quite stressful once a door is made and being installed wondering if it will fit as planned. It is a great feeling when everything is bolted in position and all the gaps on both sides are uniform.

Old screen door

Original Screen Door

Custom Screen door

New Custom Screen Door

Deco Style Front Gate

Deco style gate

New Deco Style Gate

Art Deco style renovations to pre WW2 suburban homes is popular in the inner suburbs of Sydney. The owners of this home had rebuilt the front brick fence and wanted a new deco front gate that suited the Deco style of their house.

The lead light glass in the windows and front door provided the inspiration for this particular gate design. It is unusual in that it is an inverted Art Deco fan design. It is more usual having the upward pointing fan motif.

The new gate was made using 304 stainless steel which will ensure an extremely long life free from corrosion. A custom hinge and latch arrangement was devised to allow the gate to be installed in the middle of the new brick fence pillars.

New Hinge Arrangemnt

New Hinge Arrangemnt

Gate latch

New Gate Latch Arrangement

LEad Light Front Door

Front Door Lead Light

Window lead light

Window Lead Light

Security Door Redesign

Redesigned security door

I received a call from a client who was renovating their home in an Art Deco style. They had installed a new front door with a porthole window along with small paneled windows flanking the side. The existing wrought iron scrolled security door just didn’t look right.

They asked if we could design a more appropriate security door. The existing security door was is very good condition so I suggested modifying its design to save the expense of having to make a new door.

The first job was to have the old security door sandblasted to remove the decades of accumulated paint layers and surface rust. Next, the old wrought iron scroll work was cut from the frame leaving the central area open. The new design mirrored the porthole window in the door and also aligned with the window frames either side.

The picture on the left shows the new design laid out in the existing door frame. Care had to be taken so as not to distort the frame when welding in the new section as this could cause difficulties when reinstalling the security door back onto its original hinges.

After the new design was welded into place the whole door was given two coats of zinc rich cold gal paint. After the cold gal had dried a metal primer coat was applied in preparation for the top coat. The final two top coats were allowed a week to dry completely before installing the door back on the clients house.

The picture below shows the before and after views of the front security door. The new design is a vast improvement on the original design and integrates very well with the new front door and side windows.

Plaza Art Deco Gates

New Plaza style Art Deco front gates

The front gates to this Sydney suburban block of flats were looking very much the worse for wear so the owners decided to replace them with a set of Plaza Art Deco Gates. The Plaza style is our most popular design with its classic Art Deco fan motif complimenting the style of many older buildings built in the 1930’s and 40’s.

The old gates were heavily rusted so it was decided to spend a little bit more and make the new gates using stainless steel. This will ensure a very long service life with minimum maintenance.

stainless steel gate construction
Laying out the design in stainless steel

Firstly the design of each gate was drawn onto the setup bench and each part cut and fixed in position. Every part in the Plaza design is different. The cutting and bending of parts and setting up prior to welding everything together is a time consuming process.

Completed stainless steel gates
Completed double entry gates ready for painting

The photo on the right shows the assembled double entry gates with their support brackets ready for painting. There was another single entry gate built for the side entrance of the building. This was larger than the double entry gates so it was made separately.

Stabilising cracked brickwork
Stabilising cracked brickwork

Over the years there had been damage done to the brickwork in the fence of the building which left broken mortar and loose bricks in the side gate support column. These had been patched in a less than satisfactory manner. Before the new gate could be attached polyester masonry adhesive was injected into the damaged areas to stabilise the broken bricks and provide a solid support for the new gate.

Below shows the old gate compared to the new Plaza gate.

Old gate and new gate
Comparison of the old gate and new gate

The double entry main gates were installed with a minimum of effort as the brickwork was in a much better condition. Because of the age of the bricks it was decided to use Chemset studs to attach the gate support rails to the bricks. These studs put no localised stresses on the bricks unlike dynabolts which can crack old bricks if over tightened.

The completed double entry gates are shown below.

Double entry front gates
Double entry front gate comparison

Art Deco Folding Security Panels

Reagh Bar security panelsA recent project involved the design of Art Deco folding security panels to secure the alcoholic assets of a CBD Sydney bar. The Reagh Bar at the Castlereagh Boutique Hotel needed to leave their bar stock on the shelves behind the bar rather than having to put it all away each night and re-stock the following evening.

The Art Deco era Castlereagh Hotel opened on September 12th, 1927 and was built by the New South Wales Masonic Club. It was the first reinforced concrete building in the Sydney CBD and, at the time, was the tallest building in Sydney with 12 floors. Its construction set the precedent for future CBD buildings. It has been the base for the Masonic Club ever since and they wanted something sympathetic to the Art Deco era of the hotel for the folding security panel design.

Our PLAZA style Art Deco design was selected as the optimum style for the folding panels. The design brief was for security panels that could be easily locked and opened and not be too obtrusive. A set of six centre opening Art Deco style panels were designed that satisfied the brief while keeping the overall look light and airy. Clear polycarbonate panels were attached to the back of the folding panels to prevent access to the the bottle stock through the steel bars when the panels were locked closed.

The following photos illustrate the construction of the folding panels. To keep the visual impact of the bars to a minimum 20mm wide framing was chosen. To avoid having two adjacent 20mm vertical bars together making 40mm wide vertical sections 20x10mm solid steel verticals were used which presented a combined 20mm width overall. This made attaching the clear polycarbonate back panels difficult. Since each panel required forty screws to attach to the frames they had to be individually drilled and tapped into the solid 20x10mm sections to accommodate the fastening screws.

The geometry of the six folding panels was crucial and they had to be millimetre perfect so they would meet in the middle of the bar section and lock together.

The top and bottom sections of the frames were hollow 20x20mm SHS steel and only 1.6mm thick so 12mm thick sections had to be fitted into them so the pivots had something solid to screw into.

(Click on an image for a larger view.)

Pivot attaching points

Fitting 12mm steel plates into the top and bottom frame sections to attach pivots

Fitting hinges to bars

Vertical bar section hinges showing open/closed positions.

To keep the overall look light and airy the clear panels needed to screw directly to the back of the 10mm wide vertical bar sections. This required drilling and threading for 240 screws. To simplify construction the panel operation geometry was done before the design was welded into them.

Tapping holes

Drilling and tapping holes for attaching clear polycarbonate panels to frame

Panel geometry

Checking the geometry of the folding panels before fitting the design

Once the panel folding geometry had been confirmed the PLAZA design was jigged into place in the frames and welded in position.

Laying out the design in a jig before welding everything together

Completed side with design in test frame to double check geometry

The clear polycarbonate panels were attached after all the welding was completed. To accurately drill the screw holes in the panels dummy screws with sharpened heads were fitted into the screw positions and the polycarbonate was hit lightly with a hammer over each screw point to indicate where the holes should be drilled. Preliminary testing of the panel operation is shown in the video below.

Polycarbonate panel fitting

Fitting polycarbonate sheets to back of frames

All polycarbonate panels fitted and fitted to test frame to check alignment

The folding panels are supported and slide inside tracking sections at the top and bottom. The bottom tracking can be removed when the panels are stowed open on each side. When closed the panels are secured together with a pivoting drop bolt. The operation of the panels is shown in the video at the end of the post.

Security panels closed

Installed panels closed

Security panels opened

Installed panels opened

Reagh Bar security panels

Front view of closed panels

Front view of opened panels

Custom Side Gates

Centre opening custom side gates

Centre opening custom side gates

A client wanted custom side gates built for their Art Deco home that would match the style of the original front gates on their property.

The side of the house where the side gates were required was a little wider than normal which would make a single gate too large. Centre opening double side gates were suggested which would have a more pleasing aesthetic. The fence on the side of the house was too flimsy to support a gate so a 100mm square steel pillar needed to be installed to support one side.

Using the original front gates (which we had just restored) as a guide, a suitable design for the side gates was developed which captured the look we were after.

One gate layout

One gate half jigged out ready for welding

Side path before gate installation

Side path before gate installation

Completed gates

Completed gates with a cold gal coating and primed

Back view of gates

Back view of gates

The installation was very straight forward but the house was cement rendered and there was no way of knowing if you were drilling into bricks or mortar so dynabolts would be a bit dicey. Instead it was decided to use Chemset studs which provided a much more secure anchor without putting undue stress on the brickwork.

The installation of the custom side gates has made a nice addition to the overall look of the property.

Concave Table Base

Concave base mirror table

Concave base mirror table

A custom concave table base was required on which a large black framed mirror could be mounted. The client wanted a unique display table for their optometrist business. A sturdy design was developed for the base section that blended well with the mirror while maintaining an elegant double concave surface on the base.

White LEDs around the inside edge of the mirror frame were also fitted to illuminate the display area. The table base was constructed of timber and was finished in a high gloss black enamel.

To make the concave surfaces an intricate timber framework was built on which the plywood surfaces could be attached. To keep the weight to a minimum sections of ply were cut from the ply panel components that were not structurally required. This had the added benefit of allowing access inside the base to ensure good adhesive bonding of the edges of the concave surfaces.

Routing the curved profiles for the support structure

Routing the curved profiles for the support structure

Completed internal framework prior to cladding

Completed internal framework prior to cladding

First concave 5mm bendy ply section attached

First concave ply section attached

Cladding in ply completed

Cladding in 5mm bendy ply completed

The LED strips around the inside edge of the mirror were powered by small battery packs fitted in recesses under the mirror in the base section. The LEDs were divided into two sections with a battery pack fitted either end of the table base.

Side view of concave table in shop

Side view of concave table in shop

View of the mirror top showing LED strips

View of the mirror top showing LED strips

Wollemia Urology Centre Website

Wollemia website screenshots

Responsive design Wollemia website

We usually apply our design skills to theatrical props and Art Deco security bars so it was a nice change to be offered the opportunity to design a website for the Wollemia Urology Centre in Gosford.

Rather than starting from scratch you can save yourself a lot of time by using one of the huge variety of website templates available on the Internet. There are many free templates available and for a small fee you can purchase one with a bit more pizzaz. There is a tendency for websites to have lots of “bells and whistles” which can get tedious to wade through so our approach to the design was to keep it as simple as possible while still maintaining an appealing and distinctive look.

The biggest challenge in using templates is deciding what features you don’t want to use. This is made doubly difficult with huge CSS style sheets that have been written to accommodate every feature in a template. Searching through the style sheets trying to find the code that will adjust a font to just so with just the right colour can get very time consuming. Its a bit of a learning curve to get things to do what they were not intended to do in the original template.

We based the site on the free Proximet responsive website by Anariel Design. This offered a clean basic structure that was quite easy to adapt to our purposes. The usual way to build a site is to have all the content and build the site around it. We approached it from the other direction by seeing how the pages where structured and creating content to fit. It was a more organic approach and the site slowly evolved into its final form as it was literally sculpted into shape. The only Java script we retained was for the image slider on the homepage. It’s use on the other pages were felt to be too much of a distraction.

When you have finished a site *always* do a spell check *and* get somebody else to proof read it for you. After days of staring at code the most glaring errors can be invisible to you until pointed out. Once all the content was finished SEO issues then reared their ugly head. SEO is another steep learning curve which really stretches the limits of your command of the English language.